** Archived Article - please check for current information. **

NEWS for April 22, 2002

A summary of SCDNR News Releases

This page contains article summaries. Full-length articles follow. For more information, call the Communications Office of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources at (803) 734-3950 in Columbia. Check DNR's Web site to download news articles and digital news photos, or for immediate needs, contact Mike Creel at creelm@scdnr.state.sc.us. News releases and fishing reports are available to Internet users at http://www.dnr.sc.gov.

STATE NATURAL RESOURCES BOARD TO MEET APRIL 26 IN HAMPTON COUNTY -- The S.C. Natural Resources Board, the policy-making body of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, will meet 9:30 a.m. Friday, April 26 at Webb Wildlife Center on the Savannah River near Garnett in Hampton County. Before and after the S.C. Natural Resources Board meeting, board members will be taking part in a number of activities in the Lowcountry. Scheduled activities include tours of Groton Plantation, Webb Wildlife Center, Palachucola Wildlife Management Area and Tillman Sand Ridge Heritage Preserve. Board meetings are open to the public, and anyone with business for the board or needing directions to the meeting should contact the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Columbia office at (803) 734-9102. #02 - 91

S.C. DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES OFFICER HONORED AS ATTORNEY GENERAL OFFICER OF YEAR -- South Carolina Attorney General Charlie Condon recognized S.C. Department of Natural Resources Buck Sgt. Robert N. Crosby of Grays as the 2001 S.C. Law Enforcement Officer of the Year. Crosby, who was nominated as the Lowcountry Regional winner, received the award April 11 in Columbia. #02 - 92

DIVER SYMPOSIUM TO BE HELD MAY 9 IN CHARLESTON, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC -- The South Atlantic Diver Symposium will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9 at the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Marine Resources Division's Laboratory Auditorium on Fort Johnson Road on James Island in Charleston. The symposium, which is free and open to the public, is co-sponsored by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Marine Resources Division and the Reef Environmental Education Foundation. #02 - 93

YOUNG OUTDOOR WRITERS' AWARDS ANNOUNCED BY WILDLIFE MAGAZINE -- Statewide winners in South Carolina Wildlife magazine's 2001-2002 Young Outdoor Writers' Competition were announced recently. Winning students and their teachers were honored at the Palmetto Sportsmen's Classic in Columbia. Students received $500, $200 and $100 U.S. Savings Bonds, and each sponsoring teacher received a check for $50. The first-place winner in each category will be published in South Carolina Wildlife magazine's May-June issue. South Carolina Wildlife magazine started the competition in 1987 to encourage young people to write about their interests in natural resources and conservation efforts. #02 - 94

DEER DON'T MAKE GOOD PETS, SO DON'T ADOPT A 'LOST' FAWN -- If a deer fawn is found alone in the woods, leave it there, advises a state wildlife biologist. Its mother has not abandoned it; she is probably nearby. Many people who come upon a solitary spotted fawn in the woods or along a roadway mistakenly assume its mother has deserted the animal and want to take the apparently helpless creature home to care for it. Young fawns like this have not been abandoned but are still in the care of a doe. For more information, call (803) 734-3898 in Columbia. #02 - 95

STATE YOUTH RACCOON HUNTING CHAMPIONSHIP HELD IN LOWCOUNTRY -- The sweet sound of coon dogs echoed through the Lowcountry night air recently as 28 young coon hunters participated in the seventh annual South Carolina Youth Raccoon Hunting Championship at the Webb Wildlife Center in Hampton County. Co-sponsored by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the S.C. Coon Hunters Association, the Feb. 23 event was attended by 28 youngsters and their guardians representing raccoon hunting clubs from around the state. For more information, call (803) 734-3609 in Columbia. #02 - 96

FRESHWATER FISHING TRENDS

SALTWATER FISHING TRENDS:

S.C. WEEKLY TIDETABLE


NEWS RELEASE #02 - 91 April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

STATE NATURAL RESOURCES BOARD TO MEET APRIL 26 IN HAMPTON COUNTY

The S.C. Natural Resources Board, the policy-making body of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, will meet 9:30 a.m. Friday, April 26 at Webb Wildlife Center on the Savannah River near Garnett in Hampton County.

Before and after the S.C. Natural Resources Board meeting, board members will be taking part in a number of activities in the Lowcountry Thursday, April 25 through Saturday, April 27. Scheduled activities include tours of Groton Plantation, Webb Wildlife Center, Palachucola Wildlife Management Area and Tillman Sand Ridge Heritage Preserve.

Board meetings are open to the public, and anyone with business for the board or needing directions to the meeting should contact the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Columbia office at (803) 734-9102. Joab M. Lesesne of Sunset is chairman of the S.C. Natural Resources Board, and Julius Leary of Greenwood is vice chairman.

The planned agenda for the Natural Resources Board's April 26 9:30 a.m. meeting at Webb Wildlife Center includes:


NEWS RELEASE #02 - 92 April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

S.C. DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES OFFICER HONORED AS ATTORNEY GENERAL OFFICER OF YEAR

South Carolina Attorney General Charlie Condon recognized S.C. Department of Natural Resources Buck Sgt. Robert N. Crosby of Grays as the 2001 S.C. Law Enforcement Officer of the Year. Crosby, who was nominated as the Lowcountry Regional winner, received the award April 11.

In two incidents, first thought to be accidents, Crosby discovered evidence that foul play was involved, said Condon, after announcing the winner. In both cases, offenders were charged with murder, found guilty and are now serving life sentences.

"Sergeant Crosby is a law enforcement officer's officer," Condon said. "He is unflinching in his devotion and unwavering in his commitment to duty."

In accepting the award, Crosby said, "This award belongs to all the wildlife officers in the state. The teamwork shown by the state's law enforcement agencies and officers makes South Carolina a great place for all of us."

Crosby came to the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in 1983 from the Jasper County Sheriff's Department, where he served as deputy sheriff.

Crosby was recommended by DNR for his investigative skills, "stick-to-it attitude," public service and willingness to pitch in and help any law enforcement effort. That service includes making presentations to groups, teaching hunting safety and speaking to children on woodsmanship safety.

Crosby is a resident of Grays in Jasper County. He has one son who is married and also a new granddaughter. He is very active in his church and enjoys working with church groups and civic organizations. Crosby also fills in for Santa Claus for local children during Christmas time.

This is the fourth year that the South Carolina Attorney General has recognized outstanding members of the law enforcement community. Regional nominations are decided by a committee of law enforcement leaders in four regions of the state, the Lowcountry, Midlands, Pee Dee, and the Piedmont. The State Chamber of Commerce selects the overall winner from the four regional winners.

Other winners are: Lt Roosevelt Nelson Jr. of the Sumter County Sheriff's Department for the Pee Dee Region; Pfc. Kristie Fisher-Lumley of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources for the Piedmont Region; and Lance Cpl. John Dale Owens of the S.C. Highway Patrol for the Midlands Region.

The Myrtle Beach Chamber of Commerce, the Ducane Co. and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of South Carolina sponsor the award.

- Written by Mike Willis -


NEWS RELEASE #02 - 93 April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

DIVER SYMPOSIUM TO BE HELD MAY 9 IN CHARLESTON, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The South Atlantic Diver Symposium will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9 at the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Marine Resources Division's Laboratory Auditorium on Fort Johnson Road on James Island in Charleston. The symposium, which is free and open to the public, is co-sponsored by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Marine Resources Division and the Reef Environmental Education Foundation.

Topics will include the status of lionfish off the coast, the South Carolina Aquarium's volunteer diver program, the Great Annual Fish Count, diving on South Carolina artificial reefs, and more.

The evening of May 9, the South Carolina Aquarium will be sponsoring a free Great Annual Fish Count South Atlantic Fish Identification seminar starting at 7 p.m. at the Aquarium. For directions to the Aquarium, call (843) 720-1990 in Charleston.

During recent months, there have been reports of non-native fish such as the lionfish, which have been sighted in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. The number of lionfish observed indicates that some are surviving the winter water temperatures and expanding their range. Recreational divers and snorkelers are a valuable source of information for tracking fish species including these exotic fish. One of the purposes of the symposium is to bring divers together and promote the reporting of these exotic species.

Presenters at the symposium will include Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF), the Great Annual Fish Count, National Marine Fisheries Service, S.C. Department of Natural Resources, the South Carolina Aquarium and others. Ray Rhodes of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources will be the moderator during the symposium.

Information on REEF's Exotic Species Sighting Program can be found at http://www.reef.org/exotic/. Images available for press use can be found at www.reef.org/media.

The agenda for the symposium is as follows: "Reef Environmental Education Foundation and the Great Annual Fish Count," Alex Score, education and outreach coordinator for REEF in Key Largo, Fla.; "Volunteer Diving at the South Carolina Aquarium," Arnold Postell, dive safety officer at the South Carolina Aquarium in Charleston; "Exploring the Charleston Bump: Submersible Dives to 1,800 Feet," Leslie Sautter, College of Charleston Geology Department; "Using Marine Protected Areas as a Fishery Management Tool in the

South Atlantic," Kerry O'Malley, fishery biologist for the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council in Charleston;

"Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary, Your National Treasure," Greg McFall, research coordinator at Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary based out of Savannah; "Invasion of the Indo-Pacific Lionfish (Pterois volitans) Along the Atlantic Coast of North America," Paula Whitfield, NOAA Beaufort Lab in Beaufort, N.C.; "Science Under Pressure -- The Aquarius Undersea Laboratory," Pam Cox Jutte, S.C. Department of Natural Resources in Charleston; and "Diving on South Carolina's Artificial Reefs," Bob Martore, S.C. Department of Natural Resources in Charleston.

For more information about the May 9 symposium, contact Alex Score at the Reef Environmental Education Foundation by phone at (305) 852-0030 or by e-mail at alex@reef.org.

- Written by Jennie R. Davis -


NEWS RELEASE #02 - 94 April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

YOUNG OUTDOOR WRITERS' AWARDS ANNOUNCED BY WILDLIFE MAGAZINE

Statewide winners in South Carolina Wildlife magazine's 2001-2002 Young Outdoor Writers' Competition were announced recently.

Participants in the annual contest considered all manner of animal and plant species across the state in answering the question "If I were a wild South Carolina animal or plant, I'd be a...." They chose a species, researched its needs and challenges, and then added a dash of creativity to present their essays. As part of the assignment, students were asked to begin their essays with the line, "In this land called Carolina...."

Each school sent its winning essay to be judged in the first statewide round by members of the Coalition for Natural Resource Education, a group of private organizations and state agencies focusing on teaching students about natural resources. This year's judges were Jerry Shrum, S.C. Forestry Commission; Terry Hurley, S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism; and Donna Bowman, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control. South Carolina Wildlife magazine staff judged the final round to select statewide winners.

Winning students and their teachers were honored at the Palmetto Sportsmen's Classic in Columbia. Students received $500, $200 and $100 U.S. Savings Bonds, and each sponsoring teacher received a check for $50. The first-place winner in each category will be published in South Carolina Wildlife magazine's May-June issue.

South Carolina Wildlife magazine started the competition in 1987 to encourage young people to write about their interests in natural resources and conservation efforts. Once again this year, magazine staff worked with the CNRE and the state Department of Education to develop the topic and reach out to even more schools around the state.

Harry Hampton Memorial Wildlife Fund, sponsor of the Palmetto Sportsmen's Classic, provided bonds, cash gifts and other financial assistance for the competition. These students and teachers were honored:

In Category I, grades 4 and 5, first-place winner was Rachel Gill, grade 4, Timmerman School, Columbia, Rachel Pryor, teacher; second-place winner was Coby Jennings, grade 5, Bookman Road Elementary School, Elgin, Helen Jenkins, teacher; third-place winner was Alyssa Gilliland, grade 4, Broad River Elementary School, Beaufort, Amy Wiegel, teacher.

In Category II, grades 6, 7 and 8, first-place winner was Walter C. Gerald Jr., grade 8, League Academy, Greenville, Jan Kyle, teacher; second-place winner was Elizabeth Stackhouse, grade 8, Johnakin Middle School, Marion, Patricia Hartnett Menzer, teacher; third-place winner was Matthew Rauch, grade 7, Hillcrest Middle School, Simpsonville, Kay C. Thompson and Nancy Bowler, teachers.

In Category III, grades 9 through 12, first-place winner was Caroline Mix, grade 10, Beaufort High School, Beaufort, Paola Alboni and Lavonda McGill, teachers; second-place winner was Timothy Fitzgerald, grade 10, Porter-Gaud School, Charleston, Allene Barans, teacher; third-place winner was Adrienne Haselden, grade 12, Mayo High School for Math, Science and Technology, Darlington, Ruth Taylor and Celeste Harris, teachers.

- Written by Caroline Foster -


NEWS RELEASE #02 - 95 April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

DEER DON'T MAKE GOOD PETS, SO DON'T ADOPT A 'LOST' FAWN

If a deer fawn is found alone in the woods, leave it there, advises a state wildlife biologist. Its mother has not abandoned it; she is probably nearby.

"Many people who come upon a solitary spotted fawn in the woods or along a roadway mistakenly assume the animal has been deserted by its mother and want to take the apparently helpless creature home to care for it," said Charles Ruth, Deer Project supervisor for the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR). "Young fawns like this have not been abandoned but are still in the care of a doe."

The apparently "helpless" deer fawns born during April, May and June in South Carolina will begin daily movements with their mothers in about three or four weeks. Human handling and disturbance of fawns can cause a doe to shy away or even desert her offspring. Also, a bleating response by the fawn can summon nearby predators.

"It's part of nature's plan for a doe deer to leave her fawn or fawns alone for their first few weeks of life," Ruth said. "The reason for this unusual maternal action is that the fawn at this age is better protected away from the doe. The presence of the doe nearby would attract predators because the doe lacks the protective coloration of the fawn, and the older and larger doe has a much stronger odor."

A fawn that appears abandoned is merely awaiting a visit from its mother, according to Ruth. A doe, after brief periods of feeding and grooming her fawn, will spend much of her day feeding and resting somewhat removed from her young. The fawn ordinarily stays bedded down as if sleeping, but will occasionally move short distances to new bedding sites.

"Each spring and summer the DNR gets many calls from people who have discovered these 'lost' deer," Ruth said. "Young fawns are without a doubt cute and cuddly, but if taken into captivity they grow into semi-tame adult deer that can become quite dangerous." Adult buck deer, no matter how they were raised, are especially dangerous during the breeding season. Even does raised by humans are unpredictable.

Occasionally "tame" deer seriously injure people, according to Ruth, and in cases where the deer are a threat to humans, the deer sometimes have to be destroyed.

Ruth said anyone wanting to raise a deer should consider the responsibility of such an undertaking. If an adult white-tailed deer is to live comfortably, it must have an area at least half to three-quarters of an acre enclosed by an 8- to 10-foot high cyclone-type fence.

"Anyone who adopts a fawn must assume the responsibility for the adult animal," Ruth said, "and that's an expensive and potentially hazardous prospect. Also, going strictly by the law, removing a fawn from the forest is illegal because the animal is being taken outside the legal season for taking deer, which is the hunting season."

People often ask the DNR if it needs deer fawns for its research projects. Ruth said although the DNR is actively engaged in deer research, current studies do not use captive animals. For more information, call (803) 734-3898 in Columbia.


NEWS RELEASE #02 - 96 April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

STATE YOUTH RACCOON HUNTING CHAMPIONSHIP HELD IN LOWCOUNTRY

The sweet sound of coon dogs echoed through the Lowcountry night air recently as 28 young coon hunters participated in the seventh annual South Carolina Youth Raccoon Hunting Championship at the Webb Wildlife Center in Hampton County.

Co-sponsored by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the S.C. Coon Hunters Association, the Feb. 23 event was attended by 28 youngsters and their guardians representing raccoon hunting clubs from around the state. Ranging in age from 7 to 17 years old, the participants attended seminars on sportsmanship and safety before the actual competition.

Between seminars, corporate sponsors awarded door prizes to all participants. A .22-caliber rifle shooting competition was also held during registration, with winners in two age groups awarded trophies and prizes. Before the hunt, all participants enjoyed a barbecue meal courtesy of the event sponsors.

The hunt divided participants into two age divisions. The Junior Division was composed of youths under 14 years old, and the Senior Division was composed of youths from 14 to 17 years old. Contestants were divided into seven groups, or "casts," for the evening competition. Senior Division participants hunted a two-hour competition hunt, while the Junior Division participants hunted a one-hour timed cast.

Each cast consisted of a judge and guide, and three or four youth hunters, each with a dog. Parents followed along and observed from a distance, but each youth handled and called his or her own dog. For each of the seven years the state youth raccoon-hunting competition has been held, the Low Country Coon Hunters Association of Shirley has furnished guides and hunting lands, using many local plantations.

Most participants described the hunting territory as "excellent," according to Buddy Baker, DNR Furbearer Project supervisor. In accordance with competition hunt rules, no raccoons were killed during the competition. Winners are determined based on the dog's ability to "strike" a trail and tree a raccoon. The hunt awards points based on the order of striking and treeing, and the dog handler's ability to interpret correctly the dog's actions.

Roger Odum, 17, of Ruffin, and his dog, "Hitler," won the Senior Division. Roger qualified to hunt in the state championship hunt by winning the Sportsmanship award in his age division at the Walterboro regional youth hunt earlier this year. Neil Chastain, 11, of Rock Hill, and his dog "Stalker," garnered a win in the Junior Division. Neil also qualified to hunt in the state championship hunt by winning the Sportsmanship award in his age division at the Walterboro regional youth hunt.

Baker had high praise for all of the participants and their dogs. "These kids are all winners," Baker said. "The level of competitive spirit and sportsmanship displayed by these youngsters was really outstanding."

Judges also nominated one participant from each division for a Sportsmanship Award. The Sportsmanship Award in the Junior Division was awarded to Ethan Brown of Lane, while Jessica Johnson of Walterboro, representing the Black Creek Coon Hunters Association, received the Sportsmanship Award in the Senior Division.

Baker was also complimentary of the efforts of the S.C. Coon Hunters Association and its president, David McKee. "David and the State Coon Hunters Association deserve much of the credit for this event," Baker said. "Support from local hunt clubs, sponsors and the community were what allowed us to put this hunt on, and David and the other Youth Hunt Committee volunteers really helped pull this hunt together.

"Youth events sponsored by the DNR for other sports such as fishing and dove hunting have been very popular in the past," he said. "The organizers and sponsors of this event wanted to expand upon the youth hunt concept to make sure the next generation has an appreciation for hound sports such as raccoon hunting. Regional events sponsored by local clubs have helped expand the participation in the youth raccoon hunts."

This year, seven regional youth raccoon hunts were held prior to the State Youth Raccoon Hunt. Any individual or club interested in sponsoring a youth raccoon hunt can contact David McKee of the S.C. Coon Hunters Association at (803) 343-4755 or Buddy Baker at the DNR Furbearer Project at (803) 734-3609.

In the 13-and-under group, the winners were: 1st place, Neil Chastain of Rock Hill; 2nd place, Cindy Nations, of Lockhart, representing Union County Coon Hunters Association; 3rd place, Evan Eden, St. Matthews, Norway Coon Hunters Association; and 4th place, Ray Bradford, Dorchester.

In the 14- to 17-year-old group, the winners were: 1st place, Roger Odum, Ruffin; 2nd place, Jeremy Davis, Orangeburg; and 3rd place, Micah Brown, Lane.

The Sportsmanship Award was won by Ethan Brown of Lane in the 13-and-under group, and by Jessica Johnson of Walterboro, representing Black Creek Coon Hunters Association, in the 14- to 17-year-old group.


April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

FRESHWATER FISHING TRENDS

MOUNTAINS-PIEDMONT AREA

LAKE JOCASSEE: Largemouth Bass: Good, casting crankbaits off points. Trout: Good, fishing with nightcrawlers 40-55 feet deep during day. Good, at night using large minnows and cut bait anchored with lights. Smallmouth Bass: Fair to Poor, while fishing for largemouth. Crappie: Slow. Try small minnows and jigs. Catfish: Good, using nightcrawlers or frozen herring at night on the bottom. Bream: Slow. Try worms and crickets deep around brush.

LAKE KEOWEE: Largemouth Bass: Good, casting crankbaits, lizards and spinnerbaits to the banks and in pockets. Many fish bedding. Spotted Bass: Good, casting jerk baits, spinnerbaits and Carolina-rigged worms off points in 15-20 feet of water. Crappie: Good, using minnows and jigs in brush piles 8-10 feet deep. Catfish: Good, using nightcrawlers and cut bait on bottom in long coves. Bream: Fair, using worms and crickets around rip-rap and bridge pilings.

LAKE HARTWELL: Largemouth Bass: Good, casting topwater lures and jerkbaits. Striped and Hybrid Bass: Good, free-lining live blueback herring. Crappie: Good, using small and medium minnows 4 feet deep over brush in 15 feet of water. Catfish: Good, using cut herring and chicken livers in shallow water up in creeks. Bream: Good, using and red worms in shallow water around brush and edges.

LAKE RUSSELL: Largemouth Bass: Fair, casting jerkbaits, worms, lizards and spinnerbaits. Striped and Hybrid Bass: Fair, using bucktails, cut bait and jigs below the dam. White Bass: Fair, using bucktails and spinners below the dam. Crappie: Fair, using minnows and jigs around brush piles. Catfish: Good, fishing cut bait on the bottom. Bream: Slow. Try fishing deep with earthworms.

LAKE THURMOND: Largemouth Bass: Good, casting plastic worms, Zara Spooks spinnerbaits into the banks. Striped and Hybrid Bass: Good, casting jigs, Glass Shad, Cleos and heavy Roostertails. Crappie: Very good, using minnows and mini-jigs. Catfish: Good, using worms and chicken livers on the bottom. Bream: Fair, using crickets and worms 3-8 feet deep around brush.

LAKE WYLIE: Largemouth Bass: Good, using big crankbaits, spinnerbaits and pig in jigs near the bottom. Striped Bass: Good, below Wylie dam using bucktails, jigs and spoons when water is running. White Bass: Good, casting small spinners and jigs behind the dam. Crappie: Good, using jigs and minnows shallow around brush and piers. Catfish: Good, using nightcrawlers on the bottom. Bream: Good, fishing with crickets and worms from the bank.

LAKE GREENWOOD: Largemouth Bass: Good, casting topwater worms, plugs and buzzbaits. Striped Bass: Good, casting bucktails, flukes and topwater plugs behind the dam when the water is running. White Perch: Good, fishing deep with Berry spoons and Panther Martins. Crappie: Good, using minnows and mini jigs in six feet of water. Catfish: Good, using cut bait on the bottom. Bream: Good, with crickets and worms along the edges and around docks.

MIDLANDS AREA

LAKE WATEREE: Largemouth Bass: Good, casting crankbaits and tube jigs in shallow water, fish on the beds. Striped bass: Good, using bucktails, cut bait and live bait at Cedar Creek dam and around the mouth of major creeks. White Bass: Good, using small live shad and jigs below Cedar Creek dam. Crappie: Excellent, using minnows and jigs in shallows, fish spawning. Catfish: Excellent, using live minnows, cut bait or worms in shallow water and in the creeks. Bream: Good, using crickets and worms back in the coves.

LAKE MURRAY: Largemouth Bass: Good, casting Carolina-rigged worms and jerk baits 5-8 deep to bedding fish. Striped Bass: Good, Carolina rigging live bait 30-60 straight down. Crappie: Good, casting jigs and minnows to structure along bank. White Perch: Good, jigging small tuffies, worms, or spoons. Catfish: Good, using cut herring and nightcrawlers 5 to 8 feet deep. Bream: Good, using crickets and worms shallow around docks and bushes.

SANTEE COOPER SYSTEM

LAKE MARION: Largemouth Bass: Good, using lizards and worms in shallows, fish bedding.

Striped Bass: Fair. Casting bucktails to fish schooling in creeks and on cut bait fishing shallow for catfish. White Perch: Slow. Try jigging off the bottom with Hopkins spoons. Crappie: Good, using medium minnows around piers and brush piles. Catfish: Good, using cut bait in 10 feet of water or less. Bream and Shellcracker: Fair to good, using crickets around the banks in the creeks.

LAKE MOULTRIE: Largemouth Bass: Good, using top water lures and plastic worms in 5-8 feet of water. Striped Bass: Fair, using live herring from anchor and casting light spoons to schooling fish.

Crappie: Poor. Try minnows around fish attraction areas. Catfish: Good, use cut bait and chicken livers 10-30 feet deep. Bream & Shellcracker: Very good, using crickets around fish attraction areas.

For South Carolina freshwater fishing regulations: http://dnr.sc.gov/fishregs/index.html


April 22, 2002 DNR News (803) 734-3950

SALTWATER FISHING TRENDS:

PIERS:

Garden City Pier: Open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. on weekdays and 6 a.m. to 12 p.m. on weekends. Spanish mackerel have started biting gold hook rigs. Catching flounder on live minnows. A few bluefish, whiting and some skates caught using shrimp and cut bait.

Springmaid Pier: Open 6 a.m. to midnight. Not much fishing activity to report, other than bluefish, flounder and whiting being caught on cut shrimp. Spanish mackerel caught on gold hook gigs.

Cherry Grove Pier: Open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday -Thursday; 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday - Saturday. A few flounder caught on minnows and nice sized whiting caught on shrimp and bloodworms. Small bluefish caught on jigs. Spanish mackerel caught on gold hook gigs.

Surfside Pier: Open 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Catching whiting using cut shrimp and a few bluefish using cut mullet. A few small flounder have been caught using minnows. Menhaden are also in the water.

Folly Beach Pier: Open 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Whiting, some small black drum and a few skates are being caught using shrimp.

Hunting Island State Park Fishing Pier: Pier open 24 hours a day. No fishing activity. The Nature Center open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday.

Myrtle Beach State Park Pier: Open 6 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Fishing activity slow. Big red drum and small whiting caught using shrimp.

Apache Pier: (Myrtle Beach) Bait shop open 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week. Anglers can fish from 6 a.m. to midnight seven days a week. A few small flounder, black drum and whiting caught using squid and shrimp. Bluefish caught using minnows.

Winyah Bay Fishing and Observation Pier: (Georgetown) Open 6 a.m. to midnight, seven days a week, free of charge. Bait fish are starting to run and catfish are being caught. Visitors also enjoy great bird watching of migrating waterfowl and wading birds.

INSHORE:

Beaufort Area: Several cobia taken using eel and frozen herring. Red drum caught using live minnows or cut shrimp. Nice catches of sheepshead around bridge pilings and near shore wrecks using fiddler crabs. A few flounder have been gigged.

Charleston Area: Still reporting strong catches of red drum using live bait and. Sheepshead caught using fiddler crabs on the jetties and nearshore reefs are. Flounder and trout are slow but are being caught using live minnows and shrimp.

Edisto River/St. Helena Sound: Bluefish and whiting caught using squid. A few flounder caught using live minnows.

Cherry Grove: Flounder, red drum and bluefish caught using mud minnows. Sheepshead are also being caught using fiddler crabs.

Murrells Inlet: Flounder, red drum and bluefish are being caught using a mixture of Boston and cigar minnows.

OFFSHORE:

Beaufort Area: Black sea bass are being caught on wrecks using cut shrimp, squid and minnows.

Charleston Area: Lots yellowfin tuna and small sized dolphin are being caught trolling with ballyhoo, cedar plugs and sea witches. Scattered wahoo, billfish and king mackerel are also being caught using ballyhoo.

Edisto River/St. Helena Sound: Black sea bass are being caught using squid.

Cherry Grove: Big yellowfin tuna and wahoo are being caught at the Georgetown hole trolling with ballyhoo.

Murrells Inlet: Lots of vermillion snapper, grouper, triggerfish, a few amberjacks, grunts and porgies are being caught using a mixture of sardines and Boston and cigar minnows. Yellowfin tuna are being caught using skirted ballyhoo.

- Written by James Wilkins -

For South Carolina marine recreational fishing regulations: http://dnr.sc.gov/regs/fishing.html


S.C. WEEKLY TIDETABLE
Tide at Charleston Harbor (EDST)

To find times of low and high water for other coastal areas add or subtract as indicated:

  HIGH  LOW 
Little River (town)  +12 min.  +32 min. 
Murrells Inlet  -2 min  +24 min. 
Georgetown (Sampit River)  +1 hr.,25 min.  +2 hrs.,9 min. 
McClellanville (Jeremy Creek)  +27 min.  +25 min. 
Edisto Beach (Edisto Island)  -26 min.  -35 min. 
Beaufort (Beaufort River)  +1 hr.,7 min.  +52 min. 
MONDAY, April 22
 4:16 am 	H   5.6
10:45 am 	L   0.3
 4:56 pm 	H   5.2
11:09 pm 	L   0.1

TUESDAY, April 23
 5:19am 	H   5.8
 1:143 am 	L   0.0
 5:57 pm 	H   5.7

WEDNESDAY, April 24
12:10 am 	L  -0.2
 6:18 am 	H   5.9
12:36 pm 	L  -0.4
 6:54 pm 	H   6.2

THURSDAY, April 25
 1:07 am 	L  -0.5
 7:13 am 	H   6.0
 1:27 pm 	L  -0.6
 7:48 pm 	H   6.6

FRIDAY, April 26
 2:01am 	L  -0.7
 8:06am 	H   5.9
 2:15pm 	L  -0.8
 8:40pm 	H   6.8

SATURDAY, April 27
 2:53 am 	L  -0.7
 8:57 am 	H   5.8
 3:02pm 	L  -0.8
 9:30 pm 	H   6.9

SUNDAY, April 28
 3:43 am 	L  -0.6
 9:47 am 	H   5.6
 3:49 pm 	L  -0.6
10:20 pm	H   6.7

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