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South Carolina State Climatology Office
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South Carolina Current Drought Status

State Climate Office                 803-734-9100
SPECIAL NEWS RELEASE #09-18          DNR News 803-734-3815
December 9, 2009

DROUGHT OFFICIALLY OVER FOR ALL SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTIES

South Carolina Drought Map for December 9, 2009

For previously issued drought statements see the archived status reports.

Table of all counties and drought status.
Drought Response Committee Meeting Sign-In sheet.

Discussion:

The drought is officially over for all South Carolina counties after the State agency members of the S.C. Drought Response Committee removed the incipient declaration for 9 counties on Wednesday, December 9, 2009. Much of the State, including the counties that were still in drought, received 150% to 300% of normal rainfall over the past 30 to 60 days. According to Hope Mizzell, S.C. State Climatologist, the wet pattern this fall (September through November) was just what was needed to saturate the ground and jump start refilling and recharging our lakes and groundwater. Some areas of the State such as Walhalla reported the wettest fall on record receiving 27.65" that is 14.8" above normal.

The wet pattern is expected to continue based on NOAA's long-range projections. According to Mark Malsick, S.C. State Climatology Office Severe Weather Liaison, "The current El Nino pattern has established an active, productive storm track over the southern US that will continue to deliver rainfall events to South Carolina every 4-5 days. This southerly track allows storms to tap into abundant warm moist Gulf of Mexico air. This warm moist air increases the chances for State-wide precipitation, and also intensifies the passing storms, which ensures even more rainfall per storm. The long range computer models continue to advertise this wet early winter trend through January."

Contact South Carolina State Climatologist Dr.Hope Mizzell in Columbia at (803) 734-9568 or e-mail at mizzellh@dnr.sc.gov for more information.

South Carolina's natural resources are essential for economic development and contribute nearly $30 billion and 230,000 jobs to the state's economy overall. Find out why "Life's Better Outdoors".

Drought Status Table

Current Drought Status by County
Normal Incipient Moderate Severe Extreme
County
Status
County
Status
County
Status
County
Status
County
Status
ABBEVILLE
Normal
AIKEN
Normal
ALLENDALE
Normal
ANDERSON
Normal
BAMBERG
Normal
BARNWELL
Normal
BEAUFORT
Normal
BERKELEY
Normal
CALHOUN
Normal
CHARLESTON
Normal
CHEROKEE
Normal
CHESTER
Normal
CHESTERFIELD
Normal
CLARENDON
Normal
COLLETON
Normal
DARLINGTON
Normal
DILLON
Normal
DORCHESTER
Normal
EDGEFIELD
Normal
FAIRFIELD
Normal
FLORENCE
Normal
GEORGETOWN
Normal
GREENVILLE
Normal
GREENWOOD
Normal
HAMPTON
Normal
HORRY
Normal
JASPER
Normal
KERSHAW
Normal
LANCASTER
Normal
LAURENS
Normal
LEE
Normal
LEXINGTON
Normal
MARION
Normal
MARLBORO
Normal
MCCORMICK
Normal
NEWBERRY
Normal
OCONEE
Normal
ORANGEBURG
Normal
PICKENS
Normal
RICHLAND
Normal
SALUDA
Normal
SPARTANBURG
Normal
SUMTER
Normal
UNION
Normal
WILLIAMSBURG
Normal
YORK
Normal


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Sign-In Sheet

SC Drought Response Committee Meeting, December 9, 2009
Sign-In sheet
Name & AgencyName & Agency