Saltwater Fishing Trends - September 2019

Fishing Off shore

Popular Marine Species

South Carolina marine recreational fishing regulations

Get specific tide information for various SC stations from NOAA

Information on fishing trends provided courtesy of www.anglersheadquarters.com/, South Carolina's premier fishing report source. Customers of the Angler's Headquarters online tackle store have access to daily updates and full-length reports on its site.

The SCDNR full-service Licensing and Boat Titling office is now located at:

SCDNR at the State Farmer's Market
326 Little Brooke Lane
West Columbia, SC 29172

The State Farmers Market has convenient parking and easy access to both I-77 and I-26.

North Grand Strand

Inshore: Captain Patrick “Smiley” Kelly (843-361-7445) reports that last September offered some incredible fishing both before and after the hurricane, and once again he expects the fishing to improve significantly from summer as temperatures cool and fish begin the annual fall feed. Trout, redfish and flounder will continue to gorge on mullet and shrimp on the IntraCoastal Waterway as well as out at the jetties, and as long as you are fishing in areas where bait is abundant you should get bit. Black drum should also be catchable on shrimp in deeper water areas where there is current. Bull red drum should also move closer to shore where they can be caught off the beaches.

Cherry Grove Pier (843-249-1625) reports that typically in September the fishing heats up along the pier, with the annual mullet run usually turning on species like drum and bluefish. About halfway through the month catches of whiting, croaker and other species usually gets good, and depending on water conditions it can be an excellent month for king mackerel.

Most detailed North Grand Strand Updates

Southern Grand Strand

Inshore: Captain J. Baisch of Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that once water temperatures cool a few degrees in September all the fish should turn on. Flounder action should pick up on mullet or mud minnows, as migratory trout arrive they should feed well on shrimp, and more slot-sized redfish should show up in the creeks. Black drum fishing should also get better in areas with current using shrimp.

Surf and pier: Captain J reports that the mullet run is on this month, which means that a variety of species including drum, bluefish, sharks and more will be gorging in the surf. Whiting, croaker and pompano will continue to be caught, and it is often a good month for king mackerel off the piers. The bull drum should also start to show up.

Most detailed Southern Grand Strand Updates

Charleston

Inshore: Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) reports that September should be an excellent month for inshore fishing, and with bait shrimp and finger mullet abundant pretty much everything should be feeding. Redfish catches will get even more prolific this month, and trout fishing will get better as the water cools. Both species will be caught in areas where there is water flowing over oyster shells on live shrimp and live finger mullet. With a good flounder season already it should only get better as the water cools. Tarpon should still be around the beaches and sandbars through September.

Surf and pier: Folly Beach Pier (843-762-9516) reports that with dropping temperatures September fishing should really pick up, and daytime fishing will once again become pleasant and productive. Black drum, whiting, bluefish and trout will be caught this month, and if water conditions are right Spanish mackerel and kings should be caught off the diamond.

Most detailed Charleston Updates

Edisto Island

Inshore: Captain Ron Davis Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the beginning of September will look a lot like August, but when temperatures drop 3-5 degrees typically the bite will turn on and everything will really start to feed up. The mullet run helps this process along. The trout bite will continue to be strong around points on live shrimp, but in September some bigger migratory fish should come through. There will be tons of small redfish caught on the flats and in the creeks, but as the month progresses they will approach slot-sized. Bull reds will also arrive off the beaches. Flounder fishing should get better and better on live finger mullet, and this month will be the peak of tarpon season in the inlets with menhaden or mullet. The better sheepshead should also start to bite more around heavy structure.

Most detailed Edisto Island Updates

Beaufort

Inshore: Captain Tuck Scott with Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that in September the tailing pattern for redfish should continue to be strong, but as their metabolism speeds up the low tide bite should also get better. Mud minnows, finger mullet, cut mullet and shrimp are all good bait choices. Trout fishing should also improve in September in moving water, and shrimp under a popping cork should be hard to beat. Flounder fishing should stay strong around structure, and there should also be some tripletail visible if you keep your eyes open. Through this month migratory species like tarpon will still be in the rivers where they can be caught on mullet or menhaden.

Most detailed Beaufort Updates

Hilton Head

Inshore: Captain Dan “Fishin’ Coach” Utley (843-368-2126) and Captain Kai Williams (843-816-7475) report that in September bigger redfish should get easier to catch in the creeks, while the small redfish should stay prolific even as they approach slot size. When the mullet run starts later this month bull reds should show up as well. Trout will bite better later in the month when it starts to get cooler, with shrimp still the bait of choice. Through the end of September the tarpon run should get better and better as fish migrate from the back country and group in the ocean.

Most detailed Hilton Head Updates